Half way through the year and so much more to do

This year seems to be flying by and I haven’t gotten back on track with my book. Like a previous post it is hard to get that initiative going.

Work was probably the biggest blocker over the past six months. In technology change is inevitable and if you are unable to handle it things can go sideways fast.

One of the good things that happened was I revamped an SDLC and provided additional help for Product Development. I did a lot of research by articles, books and YouTube. Speaking of YouTube I would like to get back to normal use and see dogs do silly things.

Some of the great reads I had were:

Sprint: Solve big problems and test new ideas in just 5 days by Jake Knapp

User Stories Applied by Mike Cohn

Agile at work by Douglas rose

Still going through more books to help gain even more knowledge to help organizations succeed.

There were countless YouTube videos that were hit or miss. The joys of the internet. There was one video that hit me hard with moving in a direction to create a more innovative environment:

This talk turned on a light bulb and brought things that I was working on into a new light. Things started to click and fall into place.

Next week I will be finally taking some well deserved time off and will spend time on my book. So I will be dusting off my outline, what was written before and more than likely making changes with what I know now.. Looking forward to it.

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When Frameworks fail

Frameworks are like ice cream flavours. In general there is a base set, but it branches out to a lot more. Whether it is automation testing, dynamic or static testing there are different sets of guidelines for others to follow to get the job done.

With that in mind one has to understand that there isn’t a magic framework that will make everyone’s lives easy. Another thing that has to be understood is that it may not last forever. Things change and it is up to the team to recognize it and make changes.

Now I am not saying a complete revamp of whatever is being used. Now that could happen. What I am talking about is being more fluid and adaptive. Think about my first comment, the flavours of ice cream. In the beginning there were only a few frameworks out there that were suggested for organizations to use to improve quality. They others started to add to it or remove. Basically it was an early version of freeware. Everyone had a hand in making improvements.

One of the things that I have seen is when Senior management get’s wind of frameworks or something bad has happened where they want to start over again with process changes. This is a fools path to nowhere. The amount of time to start over and to be productive is more time consuming than to review what was done and make small changes.

Now there could be technology changes within the organization that may full well require a revamp of frameworks. If that is the case remember that a framework should not be built around a tool. That is a recipe for disaster. Tools should fit a process not the other way around.

Things must be kept up to date, and frameworks need to be revisited on a regular basis to ensure that expectations are still being met.

Reflecting on QUEST 2019

Well it has been a couple weeks now and I had a lot of time to reflect on the goings on at QUEST 2019.

As always I enjoy attending and speaking at this conference. Meeting new and old friends is always a plus. The offline discussions outside of the planned tracks are always insightful and a learning experience for everyone.

I had the great opportunity of speaking on two occasions and participating as a panelist for the Managers workshop.

I’ll start with the full day class, Finding the Why for QA. This was fun and interesting. It definitely made me think through the presentation and working with the attendants.

See I took the idea in the book Finding your Why and wanted to get a good Why Statement for the QA discipline as a whole. The other tough part of the course was that it is meant for people that all work for the same organization and have some familiarity with each other. Here I was taking people who did not know each other until they sat down in the room.

The other tough part was the presentation was meant for a bigger class size than what I had, 5 attendees. What happened was that I was burning through the deck at a faster pace then what I anticipated. Which meant I had to adapt and pull more information out of those that attended. Int eh end it worked out as there was a lot of good conversations and we came up with a good start for a Why statement for QA.

To observe and share holistically so that Teams are empowered to innovate and create harmony”

I did get some feedback that it seemed I was dragging things out, and I fully admit it. Doing speaking engagements for the past 7 years I have prided myself now that I can have it all paced for the time slot I’m given. As always theory and practice don’t work out some times, and this was not one of them.

So for those that attended that class I will apologize now that I seemed a bit stuck with where to go and how to fill the time slot. I do think that in the end it all worked out as we did come up with a kick ass statement.

Next was the Manager’s workshop. This was the second time I participated as a panelist and it was great. One of the main topics I was there for was metrics. As most of you know I love metrics and talking about metrics. This was not different. I got to share some stories of my pitfalls and successes. As well as give guidance of what they could do to improve everything around them.

My last talk during the conference was about estimating. The pain of what everyone goes through. This was probably the most attended session I have done in a very long time. We talked about different methodologies and how estimating should be done continuously and revisited to get better over time.

Overall I enjoyed my time, as always, and I look forward to next year.

In the next little while I will write other posts to go into more detail of what I spoke about at QUEST. Since we all know I love knowledge sharing.